Winter Reads

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Over the course of the winter, I turn into a homebody.  Instead of going out with my friends or exploring NYC, I retreat into the comfort of my apartment and get in a few good reads.  I’ve been an avid reader since I was a child so finding a good book to curl up with sometimes proves to be a challenge for me, but I was able to find a few gems out there.  Here are some of my book recommendations for this winter!

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Penned as a letter to his son, Coates explores one of the topics of conversation in America today – the topic of race.  Named as #1 on the New York Times bestseller list and hailed one of the “best books of the year” by the New York Times Book ReviewBetween the World and Me is a page turner that provokes thought and conversation to its readers.

Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler

Written in a letter, a teenage girl returns a box of cherished objects to her ex-boyfriend.  In the book, she not only describes the significance of these objects, but she also dives into the reasons why the pair ended their relationship.  Why We Broke Up stirs up the emotions involved of a love lost and takes its readers through the whirlwind of a teenage romance.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Americanah takes readers into the lives of Ifemelu and Obinze, young lovers trying to make a better life for themselves by moving out of their homeland Nigeria.  As Ifemelu arrives in the United States, academic success finds her, but she also struggles with what it means to be black in the America.  When his attempts to meet Ifemelu in America fails, Obinze instead heads to London where he becomes an undocumented citizen.  The two reunite after some time in Nigeria with a newfound love for their home and one another.

Skylight Confessions by Alice Hoffman

Arylyn and John couldn’t be more opposite.  As these two lovers are whisked away in their hopeless love, it is obvious that their partnership will bring grief, but yet, they marry and move into the house that John’s father built, the Glass Slipper – a house made of glass in Connecticut.  Author Alice Hoffman writes the tragic fairytale that brings readers into three generations of the Moody family where glass breaks and love hurts.

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